ESNY’s New York Yankees Top 10 Prospects

Which minor league studs will the New York Yankees call up next?

The New York Yankees expect to be busy this offseason.

General manager Brian Cashman has plenty of holes to fill from shortstop to pitching to maybe even the outfield. While scouring the free agency and trade markets, he must also be in touch with player development. The Yankees have some good youth down on the farm, some of which could even be on the move in a potential trade.

MLB Pipeline’s Top 100 features four Yankees, including three position players. Regardless of what Cashman does this winter, all eyes will once again be on the next generation of New York stars.

Let’s meet the top ten prospects in the Yankees’ system and see what could be coming to East 161st and River Avenue in the not too distant future.

1. Antony Volpe, SS

Bats: R
Throws: R
5’11” — 180
DOB: 04/28/2001 (Age: 20)
Watchung, NJ
Drafted: 1st Round (#30 overall) — 2019

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The Gleyber Torres shortstop experiment is over and Volpe is officially a name to watch. He split 2021 across two levels of A-ball and hit .294 with 27 home runs, 86 RBI, and even 33 steals. Volpe also did a good job drawing walks and is a natural fit at shortstop. MLB Pipeline ranked him at No. 15, so the 20-year-old’s Bronx debut could be upon us as soon as 2023.

2. Jasson Dominguez, OF

Bats: B
Throws: R
5’10” — 190
DOB: 02/07/2003 (Age: 18)
Esperanza, Dominican Republic
Signed: 2019 ($5.1 million)

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All hail the man, the myth, the Martian, Jasson Dominguez, baseball’s No. 17 prospect. He only hit .252 in 56 games last season, but patience will be key with him. Dominguez is still only 18 years old and the New York Yankees are still very much figuring him out as a player. Remember, he was signed as a catcher before moving to the outfield. Even so, he’s got five-tool potential, so buckle up.

3. Oswald Peraza, SS

Bats: R
Throws: R
6’0″ — 165
DOB: 06/15/2000 (Age: 21)
Barquisimeto, Venezuela
Signed: 2016 ($175,000)

Like Volpe, Peraza broke out with the bat in 2021. He hit .297 with 18 homers, 58 RBI, and 38 steals in 115 games across three levels. Peraza even had a cup of coffee at Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. His strikeouts need to dip and there are still questions about his long-term bat, but he has the smooth hands required of a shortstop. MLB Pipeline’s No. 58 man should debut soon.

4. Luis Gil, RHP

Throws: R
6’2″ — 185
DOB: 06/03/1998 (Age: 23)
Azua, Dominican Republic
Signed: 2015 ($90,000, Minnesota)

Gil debuted in New York in 2021 and posted a stellar 3.07 ERA in six starts. In fact, he didn’t give up a run in his first three MLB starts. The hard-throwing righty is still developing a third pitch and needs to get those walks down. Even so, unless Cashman adds or trades for an arm this offseason, he could be firmly in the mix for the No. 5 starter’s job next year.

5. Clarke Schmidt, RPH

Throws: R
6’1″ — 209
DOB: 02/20/1996 (Age: 25)
Acworth, GA
Drafted: 1st Round (#16 Overall) — 2017

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Injuries kept Schmidt down for most of 2021, but he came back in time to work a 2.37 ERA rehabbing his way through the minors. He also had another cup of coffee with the New York Yankees, appearing in two games with the big league club. He’s 25 and no longer the top-tier prospect he once was, but Schmidt could join his teammate Gil in the race for the fifth starter’s spot.

6. Austin Wells, C

Bats: L
Throws: R
6’2″ — 220
DOB: 07/12/1999 (Age: 22)
Las Vegas, NV
Drafted: 1st Round (#28 overall) — 2020

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Wells is 22 and only has one full minor league system under his belt, but is already impressing the higher-ups. He posted a respectable line of .264/.390/.476 across two levels of A-ball last year and slugged 16 home runs with 76 RBI. His future as a catcher is still unclear but regardless of if he plays there, first base, or the outfield, Wells and Yankee Stadium’s short porch could soon become good friends.

7. Trey Sweeney, SS

Bats: L
Throws: R
6’4″ — 200
DOB: 04/24/2000 (Age: 21)
Drafted: 1st Round (#20 overall) — 2021

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Sweeney is a Brian Cashman signature upside pick, as many thought the New York Yankees reached on him with the 20th pick last year. He managed a strong .962 OPS in limited minor league action, slugging seven home runs in 32 games. He’ll almost certainly switch to a corner infield position, but early looks on Sweeney indicate Cashman has done it again in finding sneaky good talent.

8. Luis Medina, RHP

Throws: R
6’1″ — 175
DOB: 05/03/1999 (Age: 21)
Nagua, Dominican Republic
Signed: 2015 ($280,000)

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Medina took a giant step forward in his development last year and tossed a career-high 106.1 innings in 22 games (21 starts). Across two levels, he posted a 3.39 ERA and 11.5 K/9. Medina pairs a blazing fastball that can touch with 102 with a curveball that’s been described as a “hammer,” and he’s still developing a changeup that should improve his control. He’ll start next season in the minors, but a 2022 MLB debut isn’t out of the question.

9. Ken Waldichuk, LHP

Throws: L
6’4″ — 220
DOB: 01/08/1998 (Age: 23)
San Diego, CA
Drafted: 5th Round (#165 overall) — 2019

Like Medina, Waldichuk could also be in line for debuting next season. The big lefty throws four pitches and has a mid-90s fastball. He also throws a curveball, changeup, and slider, each of which seems to be a plus secondary pitch on any given day. Waldichuk posted a 3.03 ERA across two levels in 2021 and if he improves his control, he could see time either in spot starts or in the bullpen soon.

10. Yoendrys Gomez, RHP

Throws: R
6’3″ — 175
DOB: 10/15/1999 (Age: 22)
Nirgua, Venezuela
Signed: 2016 ($50,000)

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It’s taken some time, but Gomez finally seems to be hitting his stride as a prospect. His fastball hovers around the low-mid 90s and can touch 97 on his best days. Additionally, Gomez throws a curveball and slider and is also working to add a changeup. He managed a 3.42 ERA in just nine starts at Class A Tampa last season, and will certainly get a longer look in spring training. He’s a year or two away, but Gomez could find his stride as either a bullpen arm or a back-end starter.

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